Economic life – Water Valley Chamber http://watervalleychamber.info/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 08:24:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://watervalleychamber.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/wat.png Economic life – Water Valley Chamber http://watervalleychamber.info/ 32 32 How to solve the problem of tires at the end of their life? https://watervalleychamber.info/how-to-solve-the-problem-of-tires-at-the-end-of-their-life/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 08:02:55 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/how-to-solve-the-problem-of-tires-at-the-end-of-their-life/ End-of-life tires (ELTs) are a global problem accounting for approximately 2-3% of all waste collected worldwide. CEO of sustainability brand Contec, Krzysztof Wróblewski, explains the damage they can cause to the environment and explores how we can solve the ELT problem. It is estimated that globally, between 1 and 1.8 billion End-of-Life Tires (ELT) are […]]]>

End-of-life tires (ELTs) are a global problem accounting for approximately 2-3% of all waste collected worldwide. CEO of sustainability brand Contec, Krzysztof Wróblewski, explains the damage they can cause to the environment and explores how we can solve the ELT problem.

It is estimated that globally, between 1 and 1.8 billion End-of-Life Tires (ELT) are disposed of annually, approximately 2 to 3% of all waste collected worldwide. The problem continues to accelerate as the world’s population grows and motorized vehicles become more readily available in developing countries.

I think the problem of tire waste needs to be solved through circular solutions – “reuse” and “recycle” – which involve converting these ELTs into sustainable products.

Global Landfill Waste Problem

As a result, one of the biggest problems we continue to see is tires that simply end up in the landfill. While the practice is banned in the EU, in the US 16% of ELTs end up in landfills, according to a USTMA Report 2018. Not only do tires take up a large amount of landfill space, but there is also real concern about their environmental impact and the risks to human health.

Dumps filled with tires are not a pleasant sight. Large piles of used tires attract rodents and disease-carrying insects due to the water that collects inside the tires. As tires slowly decompose, they release harmful chemicals into the atmosphere and the ground, which affects the surrounding area. Recently, researchers discovered that a tire chemical known as 6-PPD reacts with ground-level ozone to produce a compound 100 times more toxic.

Three major problems derived from ELTs

ELTs present several problems for human health and the environment.

  • Tire incineration and harmful emissions

Another issue we need to be aware of is the size and flammability of tire materials. Large piles of discarded tires often catch fire and create major environmental disasters.

A terrible example occurred in 1999 when a thunderstorm set fire to seven million used tires piled on the slopes of a canyon near Westley, California, according to Chemistry and Engineering News (C&EN). A 60-metre fireball blasted smoke hundreds of meters into the air, sending soot up to 100 kilometres.

The fire was only extinguished five weeks later. According to a subsequent investigation, the surrounding area was devastated by the spread of toxic emissions and the massive volumes of oil released from the heated rubber. A more recent example, the Fire in Kuwaitcontinues to burn to this day.

Burning tires release carcinogenic and mutagenic toxins into the atmosphere, known to cause cancer and genetic mutations respectively. Among the toxins emitted are cyanide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and products of butadiene and styrene.

Currently, incineration is an alternative solution to the waste problem caused by ELT disposal, using advanced air emission control systems. However, inefficient or incomplete combustion also releases highly toxic compounds including dioxins/furans, butadiene, styrene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). heavy metals such as lead, mercury and chromium VI are also released by incinerated tires.

Unfortunately, the problem does not end there because the tires are not only made with rubber. They also contain fibers, textiles and steel cables to strengthen their structure, tensile strength and durability. As with rubber, these materials do not break down easily and will harm the environment if not properly disposed of and recycled.

  • Current environmental and health risks of tire recycling

Current tire recycling solutions that are neither efficient nor safe raise many concerns. Disposal of ELT waste remains a critical environmental issue in many parts of the world and leads to serious air, water and soil pollution problems. Although not biodegradable, ELTs are still classified as non-hazardous waste.

Unfortunately, mismanagement of ELTs is common in many developing economies, and globally, 75% of all ELTs are sent to landfills. In these locations, burying whole and shredded tires may be the most economical option. Nevertheless, it poses a real and major threat to the environment and public health. In the EU, ELTs sent to landfills have fallen from 50% in 1996 to only 4% today.

  • ELT disposal issue moved to other countries

Throwing tires in landfills has always been a durability issue. Over the past two decades, the EU has made enormous progress in addressing the general problem of landfill waste. Since 1999, sending ELTs to landfill has been legally prohibited by the European Union, under Directive 1999/31/EC (EU. 1999).

However, it seems that the issue has not been fully resolved, but simply moved elsewhere. If used tires are not landfilled or incinerated in the EU, they are transported and disposed of in other parts of the world.

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), used tires, along with other harmful materials, are often used to power industrial ceramic kilns, according to EcoMENA, a regional think tank promoting green initiatives and fostering sustainable development.

In 2018, nearly half of the UK’s end-of-life tires were exported to India to supply over 55,000 cement kilns in the Brickbelt economy. The Brick Belt is an unofficial area covering parts of Pakistan, northern India, Nepal and Bangladesh.

The United Kingdom and a number of importing countries want to see an end to this trade, which is known for its dangerous working conditions and environmental pollution.

EU directives for better waste disposal

Progress continues to be made, I am happy to say. In 2000 we saw the introduction of the Directive 2000/53/EC on end-of-life vehicles. The document sets out measures for “the reuse, recycling and other forms of recovery of end-of-life vehicles and their components, which will reduce waste disposal”.

Also Directive 2000/76/EC on the incineration of waste aims to “limit pollution by emissions into the air, soil, surface water and groundwater, and the risks induced for human health, resulting from the incineration of waste”.

Currently, PUNRs can be directly recycled by retreading or transformed into rubber-derived materials, with many applications in civil engineering. For example, some tires are shredded to produce a ground surface for public roads and urban spaces.

This is certainly a positive approach, but we need to develop more methods to sustainably recycle PUNR. Many other industries need to start thinking about their businesses in response to the climate crisis and the urgent need to reduce CO2 emissions.

Pyrolysis – a sustainable alternative

Currently, more than a billion tires reach the end of their life each year. To achieve the CO2 emissions targets set for 2050, I believe that the implementation of a circular economy in the tire industry is essential.

Integrating ELTs into a fully functioning circular economy would require tire waste to be fully reprocessed into new materials. A process known as pyrolysis is increasingly recognized as the desirable and environmentally sustainable approach to solving the ELT problem. Pyrolysis technology has come a long way, and it is now a safe and controlled process.

As by-products, pyrolysis generates tire pyrolysis oil (TPO), reclaimed carbon black (rCB) and reclaimed steel, which can be used to produce new tire components and substrates . For tire manufacturers, pyrolysis is the only effective and scalable solution to industry circularity.

Start Now: Solve the Global ELT Waste Problem

It’s reassuring to see big tire manufacturers like Continental, michelinand Bridgestone help lead the way in tire life cycle management. The manufacturing industry must now work together to reform current and unsafe methods of tire disposal and recycling to decarbonise supply chains and meet emissions reduction targets by 2050.

I believe pyrolysis technology is a crucial solution for the circular economy and can help the manufacturing industry move towards a more environmentally and economically sustainable future.

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The water of the Mayan village, future threatened by a Mexican train | Home + Life + Health https://watervalleychamber.info/the-water-of-the-mayan-village-future-threatened-by-a-mexican-train-home-life-health/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 14:26:39 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/the-water-of-the-mayan-village-future-threatened-by-a-mexican-train-home-life-health/ By MARK STEVENSON – Associated Press VIDA Y ESPERANZA, Mexico (AP) — Mexico’s ambitious Mayan train project is supposed to bring development to the Yucatan Peninsula, but along the country’s Caribbean coast it threatens the indigenous Mayan people for whom it was named and divides the communities it was meant to help. A controversial stretch […]]]>

By MARK STEVENSON – Associated Press

VIDA Y ESPERANZA, Mexico (AP) — Mexico’s ambitious Mayan train project is supposed to bring development to the Yucatan Peninsula, but along the country’s Caribbean coast it threatens the indigenous Mayan people for whom it was named and divides the communities it was meant to help.

A controversial stretch cuts a more than 110 kilometer strip through the jungle between the resorts of Cancun and Tulum, over some of the most complex and fragile underground cave systems in the world.

It is one of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s signature projects and has drawn objections from environmentalists, archaeologists and cave divers, who have staged protests to stop backhoes from bringing down trees and clean the thin layer of soil.

But for the mostly Mayan inhabitants of the village of Vida y Esperanza – a group of around 300 people and 70 houses whose name means “Life and Hope” – the train will pass right outside their doors. They fear it will pollute the caves that supply them with water, endanger their children and cut off their access to the outside world.

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A few miles from the acres of felled trees where the train is supposed to travel, archaeologist and cave diver Octavio Del Rio points to the Guardianes Cave which lies directly under the train track. The cave’s limestone roof is only two or three feet thick in places and would almost certainly collapse under the weight of a high-speed train.

“We run the risk that all of this will be buried and this history will be lost,” says Del Rio.

López Obrador dismisses critics like Del Rio as “pseudo environmentalists” funded by foreign governments.

As with his other flagship projects, including a new airport in the capital and a massive new oil refinery in the Gulf, the president exempted the train from environmental impact assessments and last month invoked security powers nation to move forward, quashing court injunctions.

Many critics claim that López Obrador’s obsession with the projects threatens Mexico’s democratic institutions. But the president counters that he just wants to develop the historically poor southern part of Mexico.

“We want to take advantage of all the tourism that comes to Cancun, so that they can take the Mayan train to see other natural sites, especially the ancient Mayan cities of Yucatán, Campeche, Chiapas, Tabasco”, which are States poor neighbors, López Obrador said earlier this month.

But the Mayans themselves are people who live on the limestone bed of the dry tropical jungle. The ancient Mayan civilization reached its height from 300 to 900 AD on the Yucatan Peninsula and near parts of Central America, and they are best known for building monumental temple sites like Chichen Itza.

Descendants of the Maya continue to live on the peninsula, many speaking the Maya language and wearing traditional clothing, while maintaining traditional foods, cultures, religion and medical practices, despite the area being conquered by the Spanish between 1527 and 1546.

“I don’t think there’s anything Mayan” about the train, said Lidia Caamal Puc, whose family moved here from the Mayan town of Peto in neighboring Yucatan state. 22 years ago. “Some people say it will bring great benefits, but for us Mayans who work the land, who live here, we don’t see any benefit.”

“On the contrary, it will hurt us, because, how should I put it, they are taking away what we love so much, the land.”

When marines showed up last month to start felling trees in preparation for the train on the outskirts of the village, residents who had not been paid for their expropriated land prevented them from working.

Village council chief and train supporter Jorge Sánchez acknowledged that the government “did not pay those affected”, even though the government said they would get compensation.

But it’s not just about the money, Sánchez said. “It will bring back jobs for our people.”

The 950-mile (1,500 kilometer) Maya train line will make a rough loop around the Yucatan Peninsula, connecting resort towns and archaeological sites. But at Vida y Esperanza, the train will directly cross the narrow, rutted six-kilometre dirt road that leads to the nearest tarmac highway.

For more than two years, Mayan communities have opposed the railway line, filing legal challenges arguing that the railway violates their right to a safe and clean environment and to be consulted; in 2019, the Mexican office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights found that the government’s consultations were flawed.

The issue of train economics and tourism revenue is more complex, partly because no credible feasibility study has been carried out. The project is expected to cost around $8 billion – but looks set to reach $11 billion – while the government calculates it will bring in $9.5 billion in revenue or “benefits”.

But these estimates are widely questioned because López Obrador is essentially betting on attracting sun-and-sand beachgoers to ruins and indigenous towns for so-called “cultural tourism.” It is unclear how many want to combine these two activities, especially if the high-speed train passes the beauties of the lower jungle.

International tourism to the country has started to recover from the losses due to the pandemic, with American visitors performing the best. In the first half of 2022, just over 10 million tourists arrived from January to June, 1.5% more than in the first half of 2019. But overall tourism spending remains below pre-pandemic levels.

Unless the army, which is building the railway line, builds a large overpass over the tracks, villagers would be forced to take a secondary road four times as long to get to the highway. It would no longer make economic sense to live there.

The government tourism agency overseeing the train project, Fonatur, says a viaduct will be built for Vida y Esperanza. But such promises have not been kept in the past.

And the military plans to fill underground caves to support the weight of passing trains, which could block or contaminate the underground water system.

The high-speed train cannot have level crossings and will not be fenced off, so 100-mile-per-hour (160 km/h) trains will pass an elementary school. Most students walk to get there.

Equally serious, the train project divided Vida y Esperanza.

Luis López, 36, who works at a local shop and opposes the train, said “it might bring minor benefits, but it has drawbacks”.

“The cenotes will be filled or contaminated,” he said, referring to the sinkholes villagers rely on. “I survive on the water of a cenote, to wash dishes, to bathe.”

Many residents of Vida y Esperanza, who depend on diesel generators, would much rather have electricity than a tourist train that will rush in and never stop there.

Mario Basto, 78, a nervous resident who works as a gardener, said he would rather have decent medical care than the train.

“It looks like the government has money it just needs to get rid of, while there are hundreds of hospitals that don’t have medicine,” Basto said.

And there are people in Vida y Esperanza who support the train project, almost entirely because of the jobs it created during construction.

Benjamin Chim, a taxi and truck driver already employed by the Maya Train, will also lose some of his land to the project. But he says he doesn’t care, noting that “it’s going to be an advantage, in terms of jobs.”

“They take a bit of dirt, but it’s a bit that has no symbolic value, for me it doesn’t mean anything,” Chim said.

While the president’s supporters have claimed that anyone who opposes the train isn’t actually Mayan, that would be news to residents of Vida y Esperanza, where locals swear Mayan spirits, called “Alux,” inhabit the town. forest.

The inhabitants appease the spirits by leaving them a small glass of wine.

Bright blue-green Toh birds, tarantulas, blue morpho butterflies, iguanas and occasionally jaguars roam the roads and jungle.

And it would also threaten something older than even the Maya.

Del Rio, the archaeologist, found human remains of Mayan ancestors that could date back 13,700 years in another cave system – but it took him and other divers a year and a half to travel through a single cave system. “It’s work that takes years, years,” he said.

López Obrador wants to complete the whole train in 16 months by filling the caves with cement or driving concrete columns through the caverns – the only places that have allowed humans to survive in this area.

But for the villagers, much of the damage has already been done.

“They have already stolen our tranquility, when they cut to lay the train line,” said Caamal Puc.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Water companies exist to sustain life. They must respond to citizens, not shareholders | will huton https://watervalleychamber.info/water-companies-exist-to-sustain-life-they-must-respond-to-citizens-not-shareholders-will-huton/ Sun, 21 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/water-companies-exist-to-sustain-life-they-must-respond-to-citizens-not-shareholders-will-huton/ Jhere is a change in the air – a vast change. Two years before the next general election, it is evident – ​​just as it was in 1977 before Margaret Thatcher won in 1979 – that the existing political framework has reached its expiry date. Then it was post-war settlement – ​​including incomes policies and […]]]>

Jhere is a change in the air – a vast change. Two years before the next general election, it is evident – ​​just as it was in 1977 before Margaret Thatcher won in 1979 – that the existing political framework has reached its expiry date. Then it was post-war settlement – ​​including incomes policies and public ownership – whose weaknesses became increasingly difficult to defend, even among those of us who recognized its strengths. At the very least, it needed a wholesale redesign and makeover, or, as Thatcher argued, repudiated with a bracing new framework adopted in its place.

So in 2022 we have the prospect of inflation of 13% or even more, energy bills that will push millions of people into misery. Add to that privatization failures dramatized by excessive water leakage and raw sewage ravaging many beaches and rivers, an incredibly overstretched NHS and workers branded irresponsible for simply trying to resist dramatic cuts of their real income. All of this has crystallized how the whole Thatcherite edifice of economic and social policy, decaying for years, is suddenly and obviously redundant.

The Conservative Party’s response – electing Liz Truss as its leader to double down on a non-functioning executive – is totally out of step with what is needed and out of step with the popular mood. The Conservatives’ substantial polling deficit with Labor – the highest in a decade – is certain to widen further.

The evidence of the mood swing is everywhere. Later this week, Ofgem is expected to announce that the energy price cap will double in October to £3,500, with a peak of £5,000 expected in April. The social impact will be catastrophic. The Truss team have yet to show their hand, but the range of floating options limits additional household help to hundreds of pounds when thousands are needed.

People are really scared: consumer confidence is approaching historic lows. Labor leader Keir Starmer’s simple solution – freezing the cork for six months over the winter – is understandable and effective. He not only has the support of 85% of Labor voters but, above all, of 75% of Conservative voters. It was about time, just a year or two ago, that a confident Conservative party and its press called the freeze “Marxist”. Not in August 2022.

So it continues. In the current context, the leader of the RMT union, Mick Lynch, is winning arguments on the need to strike to preserve the standard of living. A respected former senior BP executive, Nick Butler, writes damningly about an incompetent Ofgem taking advantage of energy companies, and agrees that the weaker ones may need to be nationalised. Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown also admits that weaker public services may have to be owned by the state as part of the price to pay to address the cost of living crisis. Only 15 years ago, when the financial crisis hit, he resisted public ownership for fear of mockery from the Tories. Not in 2022.

A centerpiece of Thatcherism – that privatization plus “light” regulation could be enforced in any public service – is under siege like never before. Camilla Cavendish, head of political unit No 10 under David Cameron, seizes the moment as she writes in the FinancialTimes that the privatization of water as designed has failed. What matters for utilities is that they respond to the public interest of cost-effectiveness, resilience, reliability and service. The same cannot be said today for the world of energy and water companies.

What to do? Even Truss offers a review of how UK utilities are regulated, leaning towards the idea of ​​merging all regulators into one. (Wrong answer.) The Corbynite left and some members of the labor movement propose total renationalization. But there is a chasm between that and last resort public ownership of individually failing utilities of the kind that Brown and Butler accept. There is little evidence that spending up to £200bn to support each utility will deliver the universal benefits needed; moreover, it is liquidity that could be better deployed elsewhere – on leveling up and net zero crossing.

The best option is more forensic. Look closer and there’s an intriguing spectrum of performance. The government’s 2021 environmental assessment of nine English water companies shows, lamentably, that six receive one or two stars. (The South and South West, the chief beach polluters, are one-star performers.) But there are three companies – Northumbrian Water, Severn Trent and United Utilities – that all get the full four stars. What is needed is a regulatory, licensing and governance regime that favors more top performers, with public ownership being the option of last resort for star performers.

It is important to note that the most successful companies all place the social objective at the heart of their business. All engage customers closely in their decision-making, variations of the way public company Scottish Water, another very successful company, has established an Independent Customers Group (ICG) as a permanent independent watchdog that it consults and informs closely. It doesn’t have to be the prerogative of the best. Every water company should adopt a public interest requirement with an ICG. Imagine, for example, activist Martin Lewis as chair of the Thames Water ICG: overnight the dynamics would change.

Ofwat must not only ensure that this happens, but insist that every company meets strict statutory universal service obligations. He began to move in that direction, but was far too accommodating to complaints and counter-challenges from weak performers. No more. If water companies cannot meet public interest targets for leakage, pollution and capacity, licenses must be revoked and companies must be run by the state for a period of time. They exist to support life, not to maximize shareholder value.

A similar regime should be established for energy companies, always with a dedicated regulator respecting the particularity of the sector. It is not nationalization but undoubtedly something higher: the affirmation of the public interest as a system and a culture. This is what Starmer is aiming for – still imperfectly but nonetheless his clear direction. It is, unlike his left-wing bubble critics who don’t care about winning elections, entirely in the interest of every citizen that makes the proposal so powerful. If he manages to keep his party split, he also promises to appoint him prime minister.

Will Hutton is an Observer columnist

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The all-new 2023 Toyota Sequoia lets you experience life in full size https://watervalleychamber.info/the-all-new-2023-toyota-sequoia-lets-you-experience-life-in-full-size/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/the-all-new-2023-toyota-sequoia-lets-you-experience-life-in-full-size/ Cut exclusively for North American markets, the Sequoia has been Toyotawhen it debuted in 2000. At the time, it carried a lot on its shoulders, rivaling established stalwarts like the Ford Expedition, Chevrolet Tahoe and its corporate badge-engineered cousin, the GMC Yukon. Size-wise, the Sequoia fell short of giants like the short-lived Ford Excursion or […]]]>

Cut exclusively for North American markets, the Sequoia has been Toyotawhen it debuted in 2000. At the time, it carried a lot on its shoulders, rivaling established stalwarts like the Ford Expedition, Chevrolet Tahoe and its corporate badge-engineered cousin, the GMC Yukon. Size-wise, the Sequoia fell short of giants like the short-lived Ford Excursion or the Chevy Suburban, but had enough guts to get the ball rolling for Toyota.


Sailing through two generations since then, the third generation of this giant-sized SUV debuted earlier this year as a 2023 model year. It was the need of the hour as it came 15 years after the The second generation arrived in 2007. So it’s all new from the ground up and has a lot of cool features that can make any three-row full-size SUV fan drool at the very first sight. Under the hood, the redesigned Toyota Sequoia comes with an all-new powerful and efficient hybrid powertrain that is significantly better than its old avatars.

The all-new 2023 Toyota Sequoia now stands against a host of rivals in the three-row full-size SUV segment and is set to turn the tide when it goes on sale later this year. Let’s find out more about this legendary redesigned king-size 2023 Toyota Sequoia.


The bold and beautiful 2023 Toyota Sequoia

With a new inside-out look, the 2023 Toyota Sequoia will be a hybrid-only model, but will borrow its underpinnings from the current-generation Tundra, Land Cruiser and Lexus LX600. It gets a beefy iForce MAX hybrid powertrain and standard 10-speed automatic transmission, both lent from the latest-generation Tundra pickup. This powertrain includes a 3.4-liter twin-turbo V6 engine and an electric motor that’s good enough for a massive 437 horsepower and 583 lb-ft of torque. This makes for a rather impressive waltz of under 6 seconds at 60 mph when properly equipped with all the performance paraphernalia.


Rear-wheel drive is standard on all Sequoias models and there is also an option for four-wheel drive. However, the top-of-the-line Sequoia TRD Pro comes equipped with plenty of off-road perks like upgraded Fox shocks, front skid plate, locking rear differential, and 18-inch forged wheels with 33-inch tires. It also gets four-wheel drive as standard.

RELATED: Here’s Why the 2023 Toyota Sequoia Is the Ultimate Family SUV

Premium interior with immense cargo carrying capacity

At the top of the Sequoia range is the Capstone trim which carries the Toyota tag as the most luxurious Sequoia to date. It gets a range of premium features that set it above the rest of the bunch. Along with plenty of premium cosmetic features, it sports a new set of 22-inch chrome wheels, a first for Sequoia and exclusive to Capstone models, and acoustic glass in the front doors to muffle outside sound.


With the proper equipment, the upcoming 2023 Toyota Sequoia can tow up to 9,520 pounds, which is nearly a 26 percent improvement over the outgoing Sequoia. With that, towing boats, RVs, or even cargo trailers is easy for the 2023 Toyota Sequoia. It also outperforms its main competitor and segment leader Ford Expedition in that department by nearly 220 pounds. However, the current-generation Jeep Wagoneer, launched last year in an all-new avatar, offers best-in-class towing capacity of up to 10,000 pounds for people looking for a beast that can tow more.

In terms of fuel economy, the 2023 Toyota Sequoia was able to solve the problems of older models with the efficient hybrid powertrain. Its new MPG numbers are 22 mpg combined for true-drive Sequoias and 20 mpg combined for four-wheel-drive ones. With that, it outclasses most of its rivals in the full-size SUV bazaar.


RELATED: Here’s How the 2023 Toyota Sequoia Compares to the Chevrolet Tahoe

Other key features and prices

Toyota offers the all-new Sequoia an all-new multimedia system designed and engineered by Toyota’s Texas-based Connected Technologies team. First introduced in the recently launched Tundra, it offers an enriched user experience with a new sight, touch and voice activation that triggers the moment you say phrases like “Hey Toyota”.

All Sequoia models are equipped with Toyota’s revolutionary Safety Sense 2.5 system, which includes a pre-collision system with pedestrian detection. Apart from that, the new Sequoia also has blind spot monitor, rear cross traffic alert and front and rear park assist with auto brake as standard safety features. All trims feature Toyota’s Dynamic Radar Cruise Control (DRCC), Auto High Beams, Road Sign Assist and Rear Seat Reminder.

As for the longevity of the Sequoia, all trims come with a 36-month/36,000-mile Basic New Vehicle Warranty that covers all components except wear and maintenance items. normal. Plus, there’s an additional 60-month/60,000-mile warranty that covers the powertrain, but for corrosion, there’s no mileage limit. So Toyota says the Sequoia will last you a lifetime.

As for pricing, the entry-level 2023 Toyota Sequoia 4X2 SR5 will set you back around $58,300 MSRP. While the top-of-the-line variant, the four-wheel-drive-only TRD Pro, starts at $76,900, the top-of-the-line Capstone 4X4 will cost $78,300.

Sources: Toyota, Toyota USA YouTube channel

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Street performers bring new life to Norwich – NBC Connecticut https://watervalleychamber.info/street-performers-bring-new-life-to-norwich-nbc-connecticut/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 03:22:49 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/street-performers-bring-new-life-to-norwich-nbc-connecticut/ Vibrant colors bring new life to Norwich. The artists have just completed two new murals in the heart of downtown. The murals, both covering entire city walls, are located on Franklin and Broadway. The Norwich Street Art Collective, a new nonprofit, brought in two artists from out of state to complete the projects and turn […]]]>

Vibrant colors bring new life to Norwich. The artists have just completed two new murals in the heart of downtown.

The murals, both covering entire city walls, are located on Franklin and Broadway. The Norwich Street Art Collective, a new nonprofit, brought in two artists from out of state to complete the projects and turn blank walls into works of art.

“The aim of the Norwich Street Art Collective is to give artists, street artists, the opportunity to express themselves and create freely in public spaces,” said collective member Suki Lagrito.

The collective hopes to show the community how impactful public art can be.

“This is a great opportunity for our city to bring hope, but also to stimulate economic development, job creation,” said Peter Helms, founder of the collective. “Because it attracts people.”

Carlos Alexis Rivera, who goes by Carlitos Skills, came to Norwich from Puerto Rico to paint the Broadway mural. He said it was the tallest mural of his career and, having completed it in several days, one of the fastest he had painted.

“I think art has the power to change the world, one little drop of paint at a time,” Rivera said. “It’s about inspiration. You walk past it and you don’t see dead walls. It inspires you – it makes you feel like anything is possible.”

Golden, an artist from Miami, did the colorful mural on Franklin. Using his name, the words “Stay Golden” are painted on the mural.

“Stay well, be nice,” Golden said. “Be golden.”

The murals are close and the artists hope they will have a big impact on the city. The Norwich Street Art Collective said it has already planned future murals.

“This is just the beginning,” Lagrito said.

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SBI Life Reaches New High; rebounded 24% in 2 months thanks to good business prospects https://watervalleychamber.info/sbi-life-reaches-new-high-rebounded-24-in-2-months-thanks-to-good-business-prospects/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 05:24:00 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/sbi-life-reaches-new-high-rebounded-24-in-2-months-thanks-to-good-business-prospects/ Shares of SBI Life Insurance Company hit a new high of Rs 1,332.30, up 2% from BSE in Thursday’s intraday trading, in an otherwise subdued market on expectation of a higher outlook. robust growth. The insurance company’s stock is up 24% in the past two months, while it has jumped 16% in […]]]>


Shares of SBI Life Insurance Company hit a new high of Rs 1,332.30, up 2% from BSE in Thursday’s intraday trading, in an otherwise subdued market on expectation of a higher outlook. robust growth. The insurance company’s stock is up 24% in the past two months, while it has jumped 16% in the past six months. This compares to a 4% rise in the S&P BSE Sensex over the six-month period. SBI Life is a subsidiary of State Bank of India (SBI).

SBI Life recorded an impressive overall performance in the first quarter (April to June quarter) of the current fiscal year 2022-23, with positively surprising growth and margins. In terms of overall annual premium equivalent (APE) growth and retail protection APE growth, SBI Life bucked the slowing trend seen among its peers.

Driven by exceptionally strong growth in non-participating guaranteed savings products, new business value (NBV) margins increased 6.7 ppts year-on-year to 30.4%, while APE recorded growth of 79.0% year-over-year on a favorable basis (3-year CAGR: 16.0%).

“The strong first quarter performance underscores the strength of SBI Life’s formidable combination of brand and distribution reach across geography and demographics. Management remained confident of growth and maintaining margin trajectory.” , Emkay Global Financial Services analysts said in a statement. update report.

With its distribution channels running at full steam, expanding product offerings and growing acceptance, the brokerage firm expects robust growth to continue in FY23 and beyond. .

“The company has three growth levers that remain in place (1) SBI’s massive distribution network (over 24,000 branches); (2) a healthy mix of protection and NPAR; and (3) the ratio of operating among its peers (FY22: 8.8%).“We are increasing VNB estimates by 12/11% to account for the pace of APE and VNB margins. We expect SBI Life to deliver a healthy FY22-24E APE/VNB CAGR of 18/25%,” HDFC Securities analysts said.

Meanwhile, SBI Life in its FY22 annual report said the company has adopted smarter ways to onboard partners, identify potential customers and speed up system integration. The company is constantly using and improving its analytics capabilities using machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) to improve efficiency and reduce risk while growing its business. A focus on technology initiatives throughout the agency channel value chain has resulted in improved business performance.

With a focus on financial inclusion to enable low income groups in society to access products that enable them to protect their life and savings, the company offers various insurance products such as “Pradhan Mantri Jeevan Jyoti Bima Yojana (PMJJBY), Grameen Politics Bima and Grameen Super Suraksha, in order to protect the most economically vulnerable part of society.

Low product penetration in India will continue to provide significant headroom for industry growth. Given these developments, FY23 will see strong demand for tailored life insurance offerings, meaning the business’s long-term growth opportunities will be stronger than ever, SBI Life said.


Technology outlook

Objective: Rs 1,371

Support: Rs 1,245

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After hitting a record high of Rs 1,332, the next immediate hurdle for SBI Life shares is Rs 1,371 each. This is the upper end of the Bollinger Band heading on the daily charts. Beyond that, the next target for the stock could be Rs 1,382, according to the monthly Fibonacci chart.

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On the other hand, its immediate support remains at Rs 1,245 per share – its 20-day moving average (20-DMA).

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That said, while the stock 20, 50, and 100-DMA have positive crossovers, the 100-DMA and 200-DMA have negative crossover, warranting a little caution.


(With contributions by Nikita Vashisht)

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Medicine Hat offers good quality of life, residents recommend it as a place to live: survey https://watervalleychamber.info/medicine-hat-offers-good-quality-of-life-residents-recommend-it-as-a-place-to-live-survey/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 21:05:41 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/medicine-hat-offers-good-quality-of-life-residents-recommend-it-as-a-place-to-live-survey/ “I’m happy because we’re going through a tough time,” Coun said. Robert Dumanowski of the results presented at Monday’s board meeting. “While there is a lot to be optimistic about…there is a lot of concern out there, and for our community to identify with an overall favorable quality of life of 95% is extraordinary.” Dumanowki […]]]>

“I’m happy because we’re going through a tough time,” Coun said. Robert Dumanowski of the results presented at Monday’s board meeting. “While there is a lot to be optimistic about…there is a lot of concern out there, and for our community to identify with an overall favorable quality of life of 95% is extraordinary.”

Dumanowki added that he “never thought a community could touch this.”

While respondents believe the quality of life in Medicine Hat is good, about a third say it has deteriorated over the past three years. The main factors being COVID-19 and the cost of living.

According to the survey, the issues that most concern respondents are municipal services and social and economic issues.

The survey also shows that government communication with residents could be improved when it comes to decision-making. Only 69% agreed that the city uses citizen input in the decision-making process, and 76% of respondents said they were satisfied with the communication between the city and its citizens.

The majority of respondents (78 percent) say they receive good value for their taxes. However, the survey shows that they are divided when it comes to raising taxes or cutting services. Forty-five percent said they would support increasing taxes to expand services, while 42 percent said they would support reducing services to maintain or reduce tax rates.

The presentation from Monday’s council meeting can be found on the City of Medicine Hat website.

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Caribbean RoundUp – Caribbean Life https://watervalleychamber.info/caribbean-roundup-caribbean-life/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 14:59:31 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/caribbean-roundup-caribbean-life/ BARBADOS A cargo ship flying the flag of Barbados has arrived in Ukraine at the port of Chornomorsk to take on a load of grain, according to Ukrainian Infrastructure Minister Oleksandr Kubrakov. Ukraine’s news agency said Kubrakov announced it was the first time a foreign-flagged ship had arrived in port since the Russian invasion began […]]]>

BARBADOS

A cargo ship flying the flag of Barbados has arrived in Ukraine at the port of Chornomorsk to take on a load of grain, according to Ukrainian Infrastructure Minister Oleksandr Kubrakov.

Ukraine’s news agency said Kubrakov announced it was the first time a foreign-flagged ship had arrived in port since the Russian invasion began in February.

“The Fuller S is the first ship to enter our seaport for loading since the full-scale invasion began,” Kubrakov wrote on Facebook.

“The guarantors of the agreement, Turkey and the UN have confirmed that it is possible for the ship to enter the port of Chornomorsk,” he added.

Kubrakov said this event is also an important signal to the market that the grain corridor is a safe and most profitable business opportunity for shipowners to return to Ukrainian ports. The ship’s final destination after unloading was to be the Turkish port of Iskenderun.

“We plan to quickly load the vessel and send it to the destination port. With this, we are ready to facilitate the capacity of ports to accommodate at least 100 ships per month,” the minister said.

Recently, Turkish and Ukrainian authorities said that three vessels carrying a total of up to 80,000 tons of corn had been allowed to leave Ukrainian ports as part of a deal to unblock grain exports.

CARIBBEAN

The World Bank Group (WBG) recently announced details of its Global Crisis Response Program to help the Caribbean and other developing countries weather multiple and exacerbating crises that hit the poor and vulnerable hardest. more viable.

“Multiple crises – including rising inflation, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, a major macroeconomic imbalance and the shortage of energy, fertilizers and food – are hitting developing countries,” the president said. of the World Bank Group, David Malpass.

He said the World Bank Group was responding quickly, at scale, and with financial impact to address food insecurity, protect people, preserve jobs, build resilience, and restore growth.

The Washington-based financial institution said the details are set out in the recently released Global Crisis Response Framework document “Navigating Multiple Crises, keep the Course on Long Term Development”.

Nearly $9 billion is expected to be financed through a trust fund, the World Bank said.

The WBG will provide approximately $170 billion in funding to support the response to multiple crises.

He said the WBG has already provided $53 billion of this aid from April to June 2022, as it scales up support for food security and continues to deepen its response to the pandemic.

DOMINICA

Dominica was named the best island in the Caribbean, Bermuda and Bahamas for the first time by Travel+ Leisure World’s Best Awards 2022.

Travel+Leisure recognizes the world’s best hotels, islands, cities, cruise lines, spas and more, based on the results of the Travel+ Leisure World’s Best Awards 2022 reader survey.

Readers rated islands on the following characteristics: natural attractions/beaches, activities/sites, restaurants/food, people/friendliness, and value.

Secret Bay, Dominica’s exclusive six-star villa resort, has risen to the top rank of resort hotels in the Caribbean.

The resort is a member of Relais & Châteaux, the most prestigious association of luxury hotels and restaurants in the world.

GUYANA

Guyana’s President, Dr. Irfaan Ali, has said that if his country develops rapidly as an oil and gas market, the economy will not depend solely on “precious natural resources” for the development of the whole country.

Ali, who recently visited Washington for talks with senior government officials, said the critical resource was an important part of the country’s development trajectory.

He said that while hydrocarbons would bring essential revenue to Guyana, these revenues must be used to develop the economy, competitiveness and open up new opportunities.

Speaking recently at a livestreaming forum hosted by the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin American Center, Ali said the fund would be used to unlock the potential of several areas, which have been around for a long time, but stalled due to a lack of resources.

“Guyana has all the natural resources to be one of the main food producers in the region. But food production must be supported by the right technology and investment infrastructure that will ensure that agriculture is sustainable and resilient to climate change and the effects of climate change,” he said, noting that a such an achievement requires capital.

“And it’s an example of how oil and gas revenues can be deployed to position Guyana, not just to benefit Guyana, but to position Guyana to contribute significantly to food security in the region. as a whole,” he added.

Ali said that Guyana’s prosperity must also bring wealth and success to the region.

JAMAICA

The Jamaican government has confirmed it spent an estimated J$18.2 million (US$145,000) on the failed campaign to elect Foreign Secretary Kamina Johnson-Smith as the new Commonwealth Secretary General earlier this year.

In June, Baroness Patricia Scotland successfully retained her post as Commonwealth Secretary General, despite strenuous efforts by several members of the 54-nation group to remove her.

The Dominican-born Scotland had faced a challenge from Johnson-Smith, winning 27-24 to eliminate him.

In a statement released last week, the Prime Minister’s Office said J$18.2 million covered expenses related to air and ground transportation, COVID-19 testing, meals, accommodation and communication. of public relations.

Undisclosed private Jamaican funders have donated approximately J$15 million for public relations and true leadership services from international marketing firm Finn Partners.

In addition, the government spent J$25 million on the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting held in Kigali, Rwanda in June.

In the statement, Andrew Holness’ government said it had run a clean and transparent principled campaign that met accountability standards.

ST. LUCY

The Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) offered its “sincere condolences” to Cuba following the “unfortunate incident involving a huge fire at an old oil storage facility in the province of Matanzas” recently. Flames have since engulfed a fourth tank at the oil storage facility in western Cuba as the raging fire consumes critical fuel reserves.

Firefighters and specialists from Mexico and Venezuela are helping fight the blaze in Matanzas province with boats, planes and helicopters while spraying containers with foam.

TRINITY

Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness has confirmed his attendance at the 60th anniversary celebrations of Trinidad and Tobago’s independence.

Foreign Affairs and CARICOM Minister Dr. Amery Browne made the announcement last week.

Browne spoke about Holness’s visit during a reception at the Jamaican High Commission’s Arthur Williams residence in Port of Spain for Jamaica’s Independence Jubilee which was commemorated a week ago.

Holness will arrive on August 28 and depart on September 1. Trinidad and Tobago Independence Day is August 31.

Holness’s visit was first revealed by Housing Minister Camille Robinson-Regis when she announced the government would spend TT$7.5 million on Saturday’s celebration.

A week ago, Holness led his country into its Independence Jubilee.

— Compiled by Azad Ali

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War? Ordinary life? It depends on where you live in Ukraine. https://watervalleychamber.info/war-ordinary-life-it-depends-on-where-you-live-in-ukraine/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 07:38:42 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/war-ordinary-life-it-depends-on-where-you-live-in-ukraine/ August 14, 2022 at 2:00 a.m. EDT Young Ukrainians outside Piana Vyshnia, or Drunk Cherry, a Ukrainian chain specializing in sweet cherry liqueur in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on August 11. (Heidi Levine for The Washington Post) Placeholder while loading article actions KHARKIV — The two bartenders work for the same Ukrainian chain. But their lives are […]]]>
Young Ukrainians outside Piana Vyshnia, or Drunk Cherry, a Ukrainian chain specializing in sweet cherry liqueur in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on August 11.  (Heidi Levine for The Washington Post)
Young Ukrainians outside Piana Vyshnia, or Drunk Cherry, a Ukrainian chain specializing in sweet cherry liqueur in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on August 11. (Heidi Levine for The Washington Post)
Placeholder while loading article actions

KHARKIV — The two bartenders work for the same Ukrainian chain. But their lives are radically different.

Vladyslav Nazarenko is in Kharkiv, about 30 miles from the Russian border. Here, the 21-year-old can’t help but fear a Russian rocket or missile attack. His bar is one of the few open in the eerily quiet city, which Moscow bombed in the spring and still bangs on at night.

“That’s life,” he says.

Pashchenko Denys is in Kyiv, the bustling capital of Ukraine, far from the front lines. There, the 22-year-old serves a steady stream of customers looking to laugh and relax – until the city’s 11 p.m. curfew.

“The war is on,” he said. “But Kyiv lives on.”

Nearly six months after Russia invaded, many Ukrainians are living — and struggling — with these split-screen realities.

In Kyiv and much of the western part of the country, pre-war life has largely returned for civilians. People eat in restaurants, drink in bars, dance and enjoy lazy summer days in parks. In the east and south, where most of the fighting has been concentrated, people continue to live in terror and destruction from Russian assaults. And in many places Ukrainians now live under Russian occupation, the starkest possible contrast to the relative ease of life in the capital.

In Kyiv, some interviewees said they felt guilt and grief that life could seem almost normal when so many Ukrainians are caught up in the widespread death, destruction and displacement of war. In Kharkiv, more than 300 miles to the east, others said they felt frustration and resignation at their brutal reality.

Both Nazarenko and Denys work for Piana Vyshnia, or Drunk Cherry, a Ukrainian chain specializing in sweet cherry liqueur and thick wine glasses. Bars are dimly lit with cherry-themed decor. Red-tinted glass artwork lines the ceilings and walls.

Kyiv was on the verge of falling at the start of the war – Russian forces attempted to encircle the capital and brutalize civilian populations along the way. But the capital has grown defiant and has become home to thousands of displaced Ukrainians.

Kharkiv briefly fell to Russian forces in the early days of the war: Ukraine controlled the city from there, but it emptied as Russian bombardment devastated residential areas. The front line remains close, as do fears that Moscow may attempt to retake Kharkiv.

Kharkiv city authorities estimate that 10% of businesses have reopened since late spring. In Kyiv, 90% of retail businesses and 80% of service businesses have them, according to the mayor’s office.

Latest Ukraine War Updates

At the Nazarenko bar in Kharkiv, most customers come alone and don’t stay long; a few may stop to drink at high tables set up on the sidewalk. Sometimes Nazarenko comes to work even when we don’t need him, he says with a broad smile. It helps to break his isolation.

Guests “share their stories, how they’ve seen it all, experienced war and experienced it for the first time,” he said. “We are going to laugh at something; we will cry for something.

Nazarenko recently visited Lviv, a city in western Ukraine largely spared from the fighting. He was encouraged by all the volunteerism he saw for the military and war-affected communities.

“It’s gratifying,” he said of Ukrainian unity. “It’s a shame that it only happened because of the war, but we finally understood.”

A few people he met, however, had spent the entire war in western Ukraine. They “don’t know what’s going on here,” even after he explained, he said. He found it “offensive”.

“They don’t know what war is,” Nazarenko said.

Before the invasion, Kharkiv was a center of learning and culture. But months of non-stop Russian bombardment has turned parts of the city into a ghost town – block after block of buildings hit by rockets with random bits blown off. The typically crowded stone central square next to Kharkiv University remains deserted.

Why Kharkiv, a city known for its poets, has become a key battleground in Ukraine

The Ukrainian military repelled Russian forces enough in late May for the city to reopen some businesses and metro lines. For months, people have crowded into Kharkiv’s metro stations to take shelter from Russian attacks. Around 150 displaced residents still live in one resort. Some empty businesses have been converted into volunteer centers – spaces that also offer a rare place to socialize.

Maxym Skuba, 30, is a full-time volunteer at a charity run by a restaurant in Kharkiv, where he helps cook up to 12,000 meals a day for distribution.

“I just work, come home, eat and go to bed,” said Skuba, who ran a farm equipment business before the war. He wore an apron and a tired look on his round face. “It repeats itself every day.”

Skuba said he had “mixed feelings” seeing pictures and light messages from Ukrainians on social media.

“I’m glad they have the opportunity to drink coffee in peace,” he said. “But I want them to remember that there is a war going on here.

“If they have the opportunity to enjoy life, then let them have joy,” he added.

In Kyiv, 24-year-old Artem Tsybulnyk struggles with both.

“It’s difficult, because you always remember there’s a war going on, and that stresses you out,” said Tsybulnyk, who lives in Kyiv but is originally from Kharkiv. “No matter what you do, no matter who you hang out with, you always remember that. Well, I’m drinking this beer here, someone’s dying – my friends, my neighbors.

Tsybulnyk, a short-bearded fantasy writer, had gone for an afternoon scooter ride with a friend. He said he will fight for his family and friends if called upon, as is required of most Ukrainian men.

In the meantime, he said, “I’m just trying to live as normally as possible.”

Tsybulnyk on a scooter by one of Kyiv’s popular new pastimes: taking photos in front of charred and captured Russian military vehicles. The exhibition was inaugurated at the end of May on a large square in front of the Saint-Michel church with its golden dome in the capital.

Kyiv still bears signs of war trauma. Sandbags, roadblocks and soldiers dot the militarized capital. The city is closed by curfew every night. Air raid sirens sometimes sound, although much less than at the start of the war, when many people lived in bomb shelters. Ukrainian flags, artwork and signs for military fundraisers are everywhere.

Bucha body count almost complete

But life goes on. DJs started hosting parties during the day. People dance to electronic music as they repair houses in suburbs liberated from Russian occupation. In a recent music video from a Ukrainian group, the country’s soldiers are shelled and injured in scenes that take place on the streets of an otherwise typical city.

Denys, the bartender in Kyiv, said he felt conflicted about how much pre-war life to embrace. He considered clubbing and dancing inappropriate. “On the other hand, it’s good to distract people from what they saw,” he said.

The bartender is a distraction for him too, he said. Spending money on social outings, he argued, also helps the country.

“That’s how we support the economy, and that money can go to the Ukrainian military, or some volunteer activities, and generally help our country,” he said.

It’s a way he has to cope.

Maria Avdeeva in Kharkiv and Heidi Levine, Kostiantyn Khudov and Serhiy Morgunov in Kyiv contributed to this report.

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Does sports betting in Georgia have a new life? https://watervalleychamber.info/does-sports-betting-in-georgia-have-a-new-life/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://watervalleychamber.info/does-sports-betting-in-georgia-have-a-new-life/ Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said Aug. 9 that she was calling for a constitutional amendment to allow sports betting and casinos in the state. Last Updated: August 12, 2022 10:30 a.m. ET Reading time: 2 mins Is there suddenly hope for sports betting in Georgia again? Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams […]]]>

Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said Aug. 9 that she was calling for a constitutional amendment to allow sports betting and casinos in the state.

Last Updated: August 12, 2022 10:30 a.m. ET
Reading time: 2 mins

Is there suddenly hope for sports betting in Georgia again?

Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said Aug. 9 that she was calling for a constitutional amendment to allow sports betting and casinos in the southern state.

“This will serve as a permanent source of revenue to ensure wider access to education,” Abrams said during a speech on his economic proposals. “We can afford it and we have to.”

It would take more than just a nod from the governor to launch legal sports betting in Georgia. Indeed, a constitutional amendment would be needed, which would require the approval of two-thirds of the state legislature and a majority of voters at the polls.

In 2022, the Georgia Senate approved a bill that would ask voters if they want to legalize online sports betting. However, the legislation died in the state House of Representatives, and future efforts will likely again encounter resistance from social conservatives.

Bipartisan support for sports betting?

Still, there may be support for legalizing sports betting in Georgia regardless of who wins the gubernatorial election in November.

Abrams trails in public opinion polls behind current Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, who hasn’t exactly been a great cheerleader for more play in his state. Even so, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Kemp plans to push the legislature to pass a sports betting bill if he wins another term.

“Kemp spokesman Tate Mitchell said the governor plans to work with legislative leaders on a measure to allow sports betting in 2023 if he is reelected,” the newspaper reported Thursday. “The governor opposed legalizing sports betting in 2018 but avoided debate this year.”

A potential prize

The recent comments come as the Southeastern United States remains a headache for the sports betting industry. Louisiana and Tennessee have statewide online sports betting, but legal betting is in legal limbo in Florida and non-existent in Alabama and South Carolina. Mississippi and North Carolina offer sports betting in casinos, but that’s just as well.

Georgia would also be a considerable prize for sports betting operators. The state has the eighth-largest population in the United States, behind Ohio, where all the big names in the business are lining up to launch in early 2023. And, notably, FanDuel said in 2021 that it had chose Atlanta to host its new tech campus, with plans to add about 900 workers to the city over five years.

Still, it’s not entirely clear what kind of sports betting Abrams or Kemp wants. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Abrams aims to tax income at 20%, like in Tennessee, but she plans to leave other details to the legislature.

“We need to start with the intent to provide aid as needed and come back to a bipartisan conversation about what that will look like,” she reportedly said. “I don’t want to set strict rules because I know the legislative process well.”

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